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strange facts

From Hand-Holding Otters To Shark Embryos Playing Dead

Nature is amazing – there´s so many extraordinary animal facts out there. That´s why I would like to share some of these cool and crazy truths with you. Today, you will learn why otters are literally holding hands, get to know a sex- and color-switching eel, laugh about the funny pictures of the rosy-lipped batfish and find out why shark embryos play dead.

Otters hold hands to avoid drifting apart

I am sure most of you have seen otters before. But have you ever watched them holding hands? No, I ma not pulling your leg – that´s what otters do. When they sleep, eat or rest while floating in the water, otters literally hold hands in order not to drift apart. Sometimes they also use water plants to wrap themselves in. To watch a really cute video of two otters holding hands while napping at Vancouver aquarium, click the corresponding image in the strange animal facts LinkCloud at the end of this post.

 

Ribbon eels change both color and sex

Ribbon eel (Rhinomuraena quaesita) juveniles are male and nearly black with a yellow dorsal fin. As they mature, the black turns into bright blue and the snout and lower jaw become yellow. This is still referred to as the male color stage. Once they reach a body length of about 1.3 m (4 ft), the eels turn yellow with a black anal fin. By that time, the eels have become fully functional females which lay eggs. Ribbon eels live on coral reefs, mostly hiding in crevices. Upon captivity, ribbon eels are reported to stop eating and die within a month. To learn more about the fascinating ribbon eel, click its picture in the strange animal facts LinkCloud at the end of this post.

 

The funny, rosy-lipped batfish

The rosy-lipped batfish (Ogocephalus porrectus) seems to have dressed up as Marilyn Monroe waiting for its prince to kiss it. The funny fish lives off the coast of Costa Rica in depths of 90 to 450 feet. It is not a good swimmer, but uses its pectoral and pelvic fins to crawl across the ocean floor. The rosy-lipped batfish ia about the size of an open hand and definitely makes anyone smile who looks at its drag-queen-like red lips.  To learn more about the rosy-lipped batfish, click its picture in the strange animal facts LinkCloud at the end of this post.

 

Shark embryos play dead to evade predators

Some shark species deposit their embryos in leathery egg cases to develop independently of the mother. This renders the offspring vulnerable to predators such as other sharks or other marine mammals. Brownbanded bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium punctatum) are found in the Indo-West Pacific region as well as coastal areas of northern Australia and southern New Guinea and grow up to 1.2 m (3.9 ft). Australian scientists found the embryos of these sharks to use jelly-filled pores on their heads called electroreceptors to detect predators. When sensing danger of any kind, the embryonic sharks were found to respond by “playing dead”. They stopped breathing and stayed very still. To learn more about this impressive discovery, click the corresponding picture in the  strange animal facts LinkCloud at the end of this post.

 

Make Sure You Know these Strange Animal Facts

Here is my corresponding LinkCloud, which guides you to the websites, where I found the strange plant facts described in this post. Just click the picture of the animal you are interested in and the link will open in a new tab. I generated this cloud using the free, live-synched and device-independent service myLinkCloud.

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